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Author Topic: 60s and 70s SF films
Torie
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Post 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 22, 2011, 16:56
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During the TOS re-watch we wound up talking about 60s and 70s SF a lot, which got me on a kick of watching some old movies. So far, though, they've been mostly disappointing.

I caught the second half of The Andromeda Strain (my roommate was watching it) and mostly enjoyed it, but Silent Running I actually turned off after an hour. I've seen leftovers less stagnant! Then I watched Soylent Green, which utterly failed for me as a detective movie in addition to having a weird sex plot grafted right on top of it for no apparent reason.

So in summary: you've all disappointed me. I demand better recommendations!

Ryodin
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 22, 2011, 18:33
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I remember reading somewhere that Duncan Jones, the director of Moon, drew some inspiration from Silent Running when he made his movie. That made me immediately add it to Netflix. But, yeah . . . let's just say I wish I had had the fortitude to shut it off halfway through like you. Or even a quarter of the way through. So, so painful!

As a rule, I try to stay far, far away from 60s and 70s sci-fi films. Except for Star Wars, of course. :D

ecmyers
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 22, 2011, 20:06
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Torie, I'd recommend The Omega Man, one of the many adaptations of Matheson's "I Am Legend." And have you ever seen Logan's Run?

bobsandieg-
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 22, 2011, 20:54
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A quick and dirty list:
60's SF
The Manchurian Candidate (Most people do not think of this as SF but it is and the director intended it as SF)
Children of The Damned
Dr Strangelove
Planet Of The Apes

70's SF
Colossus: The Forbin Project
Rollerball (pretty much the first cyberpunk movie)

CaitieCat
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 22, 2011, 21:34
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I adore Andromeda Strain, but then I like my movies slow and brainy. 2001, of course. Doctor Strangelove is AWESOME, particularly the ending. A Clockwork Orange (but TW for the sexual violence). Westworld/Futureworld. Day of the Triffids (not GOOD sf, but it's based on John Wyndham, my very favourite sf author ever ever ever), plus (if you're looking for books) anything else by him. Close Encounters. Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Alien. Time After Time.

glorbes
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 22, 2011, 21:59
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Silent Running was a slog, but the robot effects were pretty amazing. They apparently hired actors who had no legs to achieve the effect, which totally blew me away. I think its an important movie historically (environmental message ahead of its time, directorial debut of super awesome effects guy Doug Trumbull), but I agree that it is pretty much unwatchable. And those Joan Baez songs...my GOD!!!

The Planet of the Apes films are totally worth a look, especially the first one. I love Conquest of the Planet of the Apes, but the budgetary constraints are very apparent, and you kind of have to dial yourself back in time to apppreciate it for what it is.

Oh, and you have to watch Zardoz. Not because its good (because it is the exact opposite of that), but because you will never see anything quite like it anywhere else.

Torie
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 22, 2011, 23:07
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Eugene: I haven't seen The Omega Man. I should give it a shot because I do really like I Am Legend (the novella; as for the movie, I loved the first 90 minutes of it, and loathed the last half hour).

I thought I didn't have to see Logan's Run until I turned 30!

Bob: I've seen Dr. Strangelove (love it) and Planet of the Apes (eh) but not the others. Should I add them to my queue?

Cait: I hate 2001. I've tried to watch it THREE TIMES. I always fall asleep after the first hour. I watched it a huge outdoor film screening thinking I can't possibly fall asleep here! But I did. I love Clockwork Orange, Close Encounters, Alien, and even Invasion is pretty fun. Haven't seen Day of the Triffids, Time After Time, or Westworld/Futurewold, so I'll add those to the list.

Glorbes: Planet of the Apes was interesting and worth watching but I wouldn't say it's good. I guess I haven't seen it in like a decade, though, so maybe it deserves a rewatch. Don't worry, I've seen Zardoz. It's like Barbarella, only not at all fun.

CaitieCat
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 22, 2011, 23:37
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Torie: Yeah, 2001 certainly isn't everyone's cuppa. I like it, for its silent space scenes, for its "real" spaceship (no anti-grav, accelerate/decelerate flight path, et c.), it's one of the most realistic space movies ever. Well, y'know, until Woodstock IN SPACE happens.

bobsandieg-
o
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 22, 2011, 23:56
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Tori: Yes I think you should add them to your queue. (Make sure the The Manchurian Candidate that it is the 60's movie and not the remake - the film that shall not be watched) Now I like Soylent Green, but I could imagine you growling throughout the 'furniture' business. If you have no seen Children Of The Damned, well that is I film I feel with confidence you will like. I showed it to a meeting of the San Diego Vintage SF club and we had our biggest turn out, most of the people had never seen the film and they fell right into it. (As Caitie undoubtedly knows it is based on a John Wyndom novel, and again see the 60's version for the 90's remake by John 'I have lost all my talent' Carpenter.

DemetriosX
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 23, 2011, 06:16
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The Omega Man is pretty creepy, though Torie may have problems with the pacing, based on her comments on other films. Heston does quite a bit of scenery chewing, too. Day of the Triffids often feels like a 50s monster movie, but the source material does lift it above the pack. Westworld is definitely worth a look, but Futureworld can be skipped if you don't like the first one.

I suppose there's always The Stepford Wives, but again make sure you're getting the original, not the remake. Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea maybe? The movie version with Walter Pidgeon, not the Irwin Allen TV show. And speaking of Walter Pidgeon, although it's from the 50s, if you haven't seen it, you must see Forbidden Planet.

glorbes
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 23, 2011, 06:59
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Forbidden Planet IS awesome. The effects still look amazing.

DemetriosX
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 23, 2011, 14:04
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It also occurs to me, since Torie is an X-files fan, she ought to try to find the old Night Stalker series. It's monster of the week and no series mythology, but they're pretty good. The original movie was scary as hell even though it was made for TV in the mid-70s.

ecmyers
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 23, 2011, 14:08
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Quote from DemetriosX on November 23, 2011, 14:04
It also occurs to me, since Torie is an X-files fan, she ought to try to find the old Night Stalker series.

Kolchak is streaming on Netflix and I've been meaning to check it out. I'll bump it up in the queue.

ecmyers
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 23, 2011, 14:11
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Thanks for all the recommendations, everyone. I need to start compiling all these in a separate list. Oddly, I've never seen Barbarella...

I would love to hear Torie's impressions of the original Stepford Wives. And I wholeheartedly recommend the original The Manchurian Candidate. What a phenomenal film!

CaitieCat
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 23, 2011, 14:29
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Ooh, I'd forgotten Children of the Damned, though again I think the book is better (The Midwich Cuckoos): for women, I think, it's a real horror story, as it involves nonconsensual pregnancy in a rural and conservative area, with a great deal of slut-shaming and pressure. What I like about Wyndham is that he shows these things without glorying in them, and that he shows their different effects on the various women, while clearly writing in the first person as a man. Each of the women has a response to the different phenomena that suits her differing character.

This is a characteristic of Wyndham's writing that I find throughout his work, and it's so notable to me that it feels like a weird breath of fresh air, when set alongside the work of his male contemporaries. It's so mundane, but it's so important to making women readers feel part of the world we're reading.

/rant :D

bobsandieg-
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 23, 2011, 17:00
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Caitie: You mean surely Villiage of The Damned, as Children of The Damned was the god-awful sequel. (which I sadly own as itis a double DVD with Villiage Of The Damned.)

CaitieCat
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 23, 2011, 20:37
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Quote from bobsandiego on November 23, 2011, 17:00
Caitie: You mean surely Villiage of The Damned, as Children of The Damned was the god-awful sequel. (which I sadly own as itis a double DVD with Villiage Of The Damned.)

I surely do, thank you, yes. I've only seen the first, just got the names mixed up. :)

CaptainCur-
t
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 24, 2011, 20:46
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For my generation, these are the movies we grew up with, and were first exposed to as (rather brainy) children. So, their meaning for us is twofold. On the one hand, many of us (my age) can still look at them with our original sense of awe, amazement, and wonder, just as we did as kids. BUT, on the other hand, we can also review them, in retrospect, for their age, lack of (current) sophistication, and/or funny/corny/WRONG predictions of our future. (I love it when a movie from 'back then' makes reference to any year up to and including 2000! Always a hoot, when somebody screams, 'Well, THAT never happened!') So, we tend to be a little more forgiving (of our old flicks), and a little more open-minded, since we actually were able to witness the evolution of the thought, science, fiction, history, politics, etc, that has gone into changing how science fiction movies are made, and perceived. Star Wars was a revelation, a birth, and a RE-birth of the genre, and for a long time, only the Star Trek series held back the tide of everything sci-fi basically just becoming a copy or emulation of George Lucas' vision. For me, it (The Trek phenom) remains, to this day, the yardstick and the meter by which all sci-fi, past and present is judged. NOW, having said that, I still like a lot of the movies from my past, basically everything EXCEPT 2001: A Space Odyssey (or, as Mad Magazine once so aptly put it A Space Oddity!') I've never liked that movie. A few of my favorites would include Logan's Run, Soylent Green, THE ANDROMEDA STRAIN, Marooned, Robinson Crusoe on Mars, Fantastic Voyage, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, The (Original) Time Machine, The (Original) Day the Earth Stood Still, Zardoz, and of course, The (Original) Planet of the Apes.

CaitieCat
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 24, 2011, 22:46
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Ooh, (original) Day the Earth Stood Still! That is the bomb (irony intended).

Michael Rennie was there
In silver underwear...

ecmyers
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 25, 2011, 07:27
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I love the original The Day the Earth Stood Still! I haven't seen the remake...

Conversely, I haven't seen the original Village of the Damned, but I liked the remake, mostly because of Christopher Reeve and Kirstie Alley (there's the Trek connection!) even though objectively, it's terrible.

I wonder if we could try doing a monthly "movie club," watching or re-watching a non-Trek movie and opening a discussion on it here. We have a forum now, so we can do whatever we want! If we can find a way to make it possible to stream or share the movie with everyone, we could even attempt another viewing party, which we had moderate success with for the Trek films.

bobsandieg-
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 25, 2011, 10:22
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Eugene: No need to see the remake of The Day The Earth Stood Still, unless you enjoy pain. Your enjoyment of John Carpenter's Village Of The Damned is likely to be lessened when you see the original. (really? A California town named Midwich?)
Caitie: A few weeks ago I watched Tarantula and completed my Science-Fiction Double Feature experience, I have now seen at least once every film mentioned in that song.

CaitieCat
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 25, 2011, 13:36
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bob: that's pretty awesome, actually. I've seen most, but not all. Glad at least someone got it. :)

I used to play Magenta in the revue at the Roxy in Toronto, in the mid-80s.

EngineersM-
ate
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 27, 2011, 04:15
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Marooned, The Day the Earth Stood Still (original version), Village of the Damned - good films all.
I couldn't watch 'Dr Strangelove', but it's one of those 'love it or hate it' films, I think, and Peter Sellers' antics always leave me cold.
Haven't seen 'Capricorn One' mentioned - it's been a long time since I saw this, but I remember enjoying it the first time I saw it on TV.

DemetriosX
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 27, 2011, 07:42
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I did some checking and there's 2 films in "Science Fiction Double Feature" I haven't seen (Doctor X and Night of the Demon), plus I barely remember anything about It Came From Outer Space.

I suspect that Torie wouldn't like Marooned, because of the pacing. It's another one of those slow, rather silent, trying to be realistic space movies. There's more tension than in 2001 or Silent Running, but while I actually like those, I've always found Marooned dull. Capricorn One was all right, though it's more of a government conspiracy movie than SF. Not bad if you can put up with "acting" by James Brolin and OJ Simpson. It even has a Trek connection around a couple of corners: Ron Goulart wrote the novelization and he also ghosted the TekWar books, which were conceived by and published under the name of William Shatner.

DemetriosX
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 27, 2011, 12:23
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Another film that I just thought of is the 70s remake of Invasion of the Body Snatchers. It isn't bad. It doesn't hold a candle to the original, but it's far superior to any other remake. Plus it acknowledges the original with Kevin McCarthy by having him running around San Francisco shouting out his warning in the opening. Of course, it's also proof that Leonard Nimoy is a better actor when he's being stiff and emotionless.

Ludon
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 27, 2011, 22:13
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Stay away from Marooned, unless you can find it roasted by the crew at Mystery Science Theater 3000. ("That call is coming from inside NASA. Get out of there!") Otherwise, it's just too dry to watch.

bobsandieg-
o
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 28, 2011, 11:53
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DemetriosX; I just recently watched The Invasion and I thought that was a quite good remake of Invasion Of The Body Snatchers. different enough that it is its own film, yet clearly inspired by the same source material.
Doctor X really isn't mentioned in Science-Fiction double feature, but that's my own personal opinion. (Doctor X did NOT build a creature in the movie Doctor X.) However if you get a chance to see Night of the Demon/Curse of The Demon (one is the US title the other the UK title.) it's worth the watching.

DemetriosX
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 28, 2011, 14:10
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bobsandiego: The Invasion seems to have completely slipped under my radar. I was mostly thinking about the one set on a military base. Night of the Demon looks interesting (I'm a big MR James fan), but from what I've read, a director's cut would be a lot better. The producer insisted on inserting a monster on-screen and hacked out a fair amount of time all against the wishes of the director and writer, who wanted the existence of the demon to be ambiguous. As for Doctor X, he might not have built a creature, but from what I've read there is a sort of creature building going on, and the movie itself is very much a part of the genre that most influenced Rocky Horror, so I'll give them that.

bobsandieg-
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 28, 2011, 18:52
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DemetriosX: There no creature building of any kind on Doctor X. There's artifical flesh and it plays a part in the murder mystey, but no creaures. In the song we here about Doctor X building a creature during the chorus when we are also hearing about Brad and Janet, not other clsssic films get mentioned during the Chorus and Dr X is kind of a forgoten film and was never a classic of SF filmdom. Hense my thought mr. O'Brien was not really referencing it in the song, but I'm an odd thinker and I knwo that.
The remake you are thinking of is The Body Snatchers and was pretty horrid, so horrid it kept me away from The Invasion which turned out to be a mistake.

bobsandieg-
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 28, 2011, 18:54
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Quote from CaitieCat on November 25, 2011, 13:36
bob: that's pretty awesome, actually. I've seen most, but not all. Glad at least someone got it. :)

I used to play Magenta in the revue at the Roxy in Toronto, in the mid-80s.

And during the mid 80's I was doing Riff-Raff every weekend at the Ken Theater in San Diego!!

:)
:D

CaitieCat
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 28, 2011, 20:15
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My BROTHA! Lay some elbow-action on me. :D

And during the mid 80's I was doing Riff-Raff every weekend at the Ken Theater in San Diego!!

:)
:D

DemetriosX
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 29, 2011, 06:16
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@bob, well I was thinking the artificial flesh business was sort of like building a creature. At the very least, it's on the same spectrum. But more importantly, the film is part of the "creepy old house" genre and that strongly informs Rocky Horror.

I guess I also ought to 'fess up and admit that I never much cared for Rocky Horror. I'm in the right demographic and all, but I just never seemed to get caught up in the participation aspects. And that means I wound up focusing on the story, which is really pretty weak. A few decent songs (including the one we're talking about here), but other than that? My overall reaction is a bit like Tim Bisley's to The Time Warp in Spaced:

So what? I hate it. It's boil-in-the-bag perversion for sexually repressed accountants and first-year drama students with too many posters of Betty Blue, The Blues Brothers, Big Blue and Blue Velvet on their blue bloody walls.

CaitieCat
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 29, 2011, 14:43
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The participation, for me, was like this site: about the people I met. The first friend I ever had with a Newfoundlander accent was one of the people in the revue, for instance, and the first openly gay man who became a friend of mine (this was 1981, to be fair), and a lot of others, people I'd never have met without Rocky. Similarly here, I suspect that many of you are of a political bent that would mean we'd likely never meet or exchange views in any civil way - without Trek.

All shared media, for me, is about meeting people who aren't me, people who aren't like me, except that we like $PROPERTY. Music, books, plays, movies, TV, it's all about finding other people who like it, and are different from me. I am and always have been a committed xenophile - I'm the character in Close Encounters who chooses to go with the aliens, because they're alien. I learned six languages because I like people From Away, and that's a good way to meet them. Well, and a bit of aptitude, maybe (three of them I learned at the same time: DE, RU, and JP). I want to be able to go anywhere in the world and speak a language that at least some people there might speak. I still need to collect Hindi, Arabic, and Mandarin. It's like a Pokelanguage thing.

Torie
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 29, 2011, 15:02
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Demetrios: I really have no problem with slow movies (last week I saw Melancholia, as an example, but I have a perverse intellectual fondness for Lars von Trier), you're giving me a bad reputation! The Stepford Wives was fairly eh to me. I certainly didn't find it creepy. I keep meaning to see Forbidden Planet, though. I've seen a few Night Stalker episodes--pretty effective, if not brilliant.

Eugene: Ack, The Manchurian Candidate! That's on the list. I know I have to see that. I, too, love the original Day the Earth Stood Still. It should be required viewing. I'd do a movie club! And a book club. And a games club...

Cait: I'm surprised you think that about the political bent, as you can guess where Eugene and I fall on that spectrum. Back at Tor we had some hardline conservatives, but they didn't really follow us here. (I suppose others will correct me if I'm mistaken.) I used to kind of gird myself if I was posting something 'ism-related but that all went away when we started our own site, which has been extremely beneficial to my blood pressure and overall health and happiness.

DemetriosX
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 29, 2011, 16:31
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Torie: Well, you had said that the problems you had with both Silent Running and 2001 had to do with the slow pacing. Marooned has a lot in common with both of those films in terms of cinematics, though not story. If Silent Running puts you to sleep, Marooned will have you out cold before the couch cushions are warm. You know that longish sequence in 2001 between HAL refusing to open the pod bay doors and Bowman making his daring, helmetless leap through the vacuum of space to get back into the ship? That's most of Marooned.

As for the Stepford Wives, it wasn't really supposed to be creepy. It's social commentary, but it may be past its sell-by date, like a lot of the progressive stuff in TOS that made you shake your head at their treatment of women. The Night Stalker series never quite lived up to what it wanted to do, but the original TV movie, the one set in Vegas, is pretty darn scary. Not least because it's in Vegas and most of the movie takes place in the bright sunshine. You must see Forbidden Planet, though you should probably prepare yourself for the sight of Leslie Nielsen as the romantic lead.

Caitie: I get the importance of the participation, but I suppose you could say I don't grok it. It's an intellectual understanding and nothing more. I saw it the first time at the LASFS con in 1978, so participation was limited to shouting, and again a few months later at the Rialto in Pasadena. But that was before the audience show became such a big part of the experience. A few people dressed up, but that's about it beyond cards, toast, lighters, rice and commentary. I'm pretty slow to relax and open up to people and I was even more uptight back then. The kind of stuff they started doing a few years later to get more reserved audience members involved would have had me flailing my arms to get people away from me as I beat a hasty retreat for the exit.

But I see what you get out of it. That quote from Spaced has to be read in Simon Pegg's voice as he becomes more and more frantic with every word and every "B" is more explosive than the last. Also, Spaced is awesome and has lots of SFnal references in it, although it is well outside the 60s/70s range of this thread.

bobsandieg-
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 29, 2011, 17:58
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Torei & Eugene: I think The Manchurian Candidate will seriously mess with you image of Angela Lansbury. (snicker snicker snicker) This past weekend at Loscon 38 one event was A conversation With Nicholas Meyer, naturally I showed up early to get a front row seat. He's always entertaining to listen to, anywho a comment he made. "You'd have to have something seriously wrong with your noodle to spend 90 million dollars remaking a Manchurian Candidate without any Manchuria in it." (More of a paraphrase but pretty darn close.)

CaitieCat
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: November 29, 2011, 19:01
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Torie: LOL, it's not the extremism of you lot that makes me think we wouldn't have much in common, but my own extremism. I like to characterize myself as being so far left even Che can't see me. As an example, I've spent much of the day reading and nodding along to Trotsky in his work on the path of the rise of fascism, and also shuddering somewhat.

bobsandieg-
o
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 1, 2011, 18:55
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Sinec I'm good at upsetting both Left and Right I've always kept politics out of fan discussions. (That's one reason I have my won blog, a place to blather and not derail things.)

ecmyers
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 2, 2011, 10:10
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Quote from bobsandiego on November 29, 2011, 17:58
Torei & Eugene: I think The Manchurian Candidate will seriously mess with you image of Angela Lansbury. (snicker snicker snicker)

Oh, it did--further reinforced by her amazing performance in Sweeney Todd.

bobsandieg-
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 2, 2011, 17:51
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The Manchurian Candidate is also generally credited with the first Karate fight in a US Film, between Henry Silva and Frank Sinatra. During the fight Sinatra broke his hand when he broke though a table that had moved out of position. (the table had a breakaway portiong, but that's not where he it it)
@ Torie
Forbidden Planet is very cool, but it is a 50's films and culturally it is very dated. Howevere when you see it you'll see where it inspired Roddenberry on Star Trek. But I kept it off the list because I thought we were discussing 60s and 70s films.

Torie
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 4, 2011, 23:40
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Cait: Hahaha! Okay, just checking. Message me sometime if you ever want to talk politics.

Bob: Yeah, I try to keep it out of fandom unless the work is overtly political itself (like the rebooted BSG's Iraq War season... that was weird!).

Tangentially related to Angela Lansbury, I've been meaning to re-watch One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest after watching Louise Fletcher for seven seasons of DS9.

DemetriosX
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 5, 2011, 06:45
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Heh, Cuckoo's Nest will have you going, "But, but that's..." for a while. Not only will you realize that compared to Nurse Ratched, Kai Winn is actually nice and reasonable, but you'll have to deal with the fact that two of the inmates are Danny DeVito and Christopher Lloyd. Vincent Schiavelli and Will Sampson aren't that far from their usual sorts of roles and Brad Dourif is only odd because he's shy as well as disturbed, but DeVito and Lloyd are far from what you expect.

Torie
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 5, 2011, 11:21
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Demetrios: Oh, I've seen it, but it's been a while. It's also one of my favorite books.

toryx
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 5, 2011, 12:47
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Maybe we should just have a politics thread and get it over with.

To get back on topic: For some reason I never have seen Cuckoo's Nest. I had no idea that Danny DeVito and Christopher Lloyd were in it. Far out.

DemetriosX
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 5, 2011, 12:50
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Hmm, you actually said REwatch. Reading comprehension, I has it.

There's a fair amount of Trek connections in that movie. Louise Fletcher in DS9, Christopher Lloyd in ST:III, Brad Dourif was in a couple episodes of Voyager, Vincent Schiavelli was in an episode of TNG. All we're missing is somebody from Enterprise and maybe from the TV version of TOS.

CaitieCat
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 5, 2011, 17:21
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Huh. Brad Dourif was also in the X-Files episode from first season, "Beyond the Sea", and was of course Grima Wormtongue in the LOTR movies. Funny how you can not think of someone for months, and then see their name twice in a week.

DemetriosX
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 6, 2011, 07:41
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For me, Brad Dourif has always been Bruce Dern: The Next Generation. He took over the "man between 20 and 40 who is wound WAY too tight" roles, though Dourif has a bit more range than Dern. He does sinister better; I can't see Bruce Dern really pulling off Wormtongue.

Dwight Schultz, OTOH, is the poor man's Bruce Dern. He tries to fill the same niche, but never quite pulls it off. Maybe his skills were hampered by spending years in a cast where the other 3 never did more than mug for the camera. But I suppose we'll get to him later. Interestingly, both Dourif and Schultz were on B5.

bobsandieg-
o
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Posts: 58
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 6, 2011, 11:35
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I've always like Dwight Schultz, and I think he has a bit more range than the roles he has gotten would indicate. I liked him in Fat Man and Little Boy where he played J. Robert Oppenheimer along side Paul Newman's General Leslie Groves. (The film is flawed in that it doesn't really know whose story it is telling, but I enjoyed it despite the flaws.)

Ludon
Ensign
Posts: 27
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 6, 2011, 22:43
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One movie worth tracking down - for historical research - would be "Chariots of the Gods" based on Erich Von Daniken's books "Chariots of the Gods" and "Gods From Outer Space." While those books seem largely forgotten and the movie almost completely forgotten, there was a period during the 70s when their influence could be noticed everywhere - even in "Close Encounters of the Third Kind."

bobsandieg-
o
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 7, 2011, 01:14
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Oh yes I remember the 70s well. A time of ESP powers everywhere and lots of interest and ancient visitations.

sps49
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 7, 2011, 03:30
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Does TV count? I really enjoyed UFO back in the day, and most of the early episodes hold up okay, but it lost its focus after a while. That opening, though, is classic!

bobsandieg-
o
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 7, 2011, 10:43
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I had never seen UFO until just about 18 months ago when my sweetie-wife and I watched the entire series on DVD via Netflix. (man, I love living in the future.) She had seen the series so this was a rewatch for her. I totally cracked up when Striker shouted that Racial hatred had burned itself out five years ago. Wow not only was racism gone, that knew the date it stopped, apparently 1975. LOL

Torie
Administrator
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 9, 2011, 10:57
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I love Brad Dourif. My first encounter with him was that X-Files episode, which remains one of my favorites. He's perfected the big, watery-eyed creep look so well. I'd still love to see him play Iago, but I guess he's a little old for that now.

I'll be watching him again soon because I finally got a blu-ray player and the first thing up for viewing is the LOTR trilogy.

Johnny Pez
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: December 20, 2011, 03:44
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If TV counts, then I'm going to have to bring up The Prisoner. And, like so many others here, I mean the original and not the remake. (How sad is it that the phrase "see the original, not the remake" has become so characteristic of our age?) It's still as fascinating and puzzling now as it was back in the '60s. Not only can you argue endlessly about what it means, you can even argue about which order to see the episodes in.

On the internet, everyone knows you're a dog.

bobsandieg-
o
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: January 19, 2012, 17:54
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Let me add a couple more movies that aren't SF, but are sort of SF adjacent.
Flight Of The Pheonix And that would be the original, not the thrice cursed remake. The idea of making an new airplane out of a crashed one is a concept i think deep in the soul of the modern geek. That with out techn and our brains we can survive.
The Wicker Man (do I have to say it? the original not the woman hating remake. Really dud where did you get woman hating out that first movie?) This film can be best described as an art-house, musical, horror film, and people either really like it or they think its a jumbled mess. I think it's one of Christopher Lee's best performances.

Ludon
Ensign
Posts: 27
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: January 20, 2012, 04:10
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The Stranger - a pilot for a series that didn't happen aired back in 1973. This was a blending of Journey To The Far Side Of The Sun (without the Gerry Anderson sets or props) with 1984. I'm not sure how this would hold up today but I remember enjoying it when I saw it then and in re-runs during the 70s and early 80s - maybe seeing it once every five years or so. A line from this that has stuck with me is "Remember. The TV watches you."

On second thought, don't bother unless you want to research bad movies. I just looked at the IMDB page for this one. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070742/ The reviews made it clear that it would not hold up for me - that is unless I can find the MST3K "Stranded In Space" episode. I must have missed that one.

And don't bother with The Starlost. I found the DVD set at a very reduced price and so far I've only looked at one episode - Children Of Methuselah - the one I could remember the most of from my one viewing back in the 70s. The worst of any Trek is better than this. The children in this episode were in training to be the back-up crew for The Ark. On being selected for training, they were given medications to stop their growth. They've been children for over 500 years but they've become smart socially-retarded children because they live only for their task which they believe is actually piloting the ship. They have numbers instead of names and their play consists of having a computer stimulate the pleasure centers of their brains. When the heroes learn of their condition they ask #5 (a 13 year-old girl) "But don't you want to grow up and be a woman?" She replies "Oh yes. I want to be a woman and have babies with #7 (a 12 year-old boy) to populate the new Earth." As bad as that line is, she said it with the same inflection as that conditioned response in The Manchurian Candidate. That's about as exciting as it got - unless you like older teenaged boys. The few older boys wore uniforms so tight that you not only knew for sure that it was a boy, you could tell what kind of underwear he had on under that costume. This series is a product of the 70s that is best left in the 70s.

CaitieCat
Ensign
Posts: 32
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: January 21, 2012, 01:24
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LOL - the Starlost was truly something. It was made on a budget that made old Dr. Who look lush, in a studio in east Toronto about two miles from where I lived as a teen. Walter Koenig got a role on it, playing an alien called "Oro" who wore a gold-lamé jumpsuit and had a flying saucer.

Sadly, it could have been such a cool thing, but it really wasn't. The writing was so awful, the acting and props nd sets were...gah. Even the presence of 2001's Keir Dullea as one of the two pathetic male leads (the other is a TV weatherman in Toronto now, for a good thirty years) couldn't make the show watchable.

Harlan Ellison was successful in forcing the producers not to use his real name (he was credited as Cordwainer Bird, his Alan Smithee handle), while poor Ben Bova got stuck with credit as the "science advisor" for the show (he quit after one episode had aired).

Truly an appalling mess, one of the few really bad things to come out of the early years of the CanCon rules. By law, public broadcast TV must show a certain percentage of Canadian-produced work, with some complex formulae about whether something is Canadian enough - in the early years, this meant some really appalling dreck was broadcast (*cough*TheTroubleWithTracy*cough*), but in more recent years, it's brought some pretty damn good shows to the air, like X-Files and Supernatural and Stargate and The Tudors and a bunch of others, all of which were/are shot or produced in Canada and thus count to some greater or lesser extent.

Ludon
Ensign
Posts: 27
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: January 21, 2012, 01:41
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Harlan Ellison and Ben Bova each wrote a book to apologize and explain their side of what happened. Ellison's book is Phoenix Without Ashes and Bova's is The Starcrossed.

I guess the CBC/Disney series Danger Bay was part of that CanCon deal. I enjoyed that when it ran on Disney but I'm not sure if it would hold up for me now. Doctor Roberts has become Doc Cottle.

Ludon
Ensign
Posts: 27
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: February 6, 2013, 23:32
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I watched the original Rollerball not long ago. (First time in at least Ten years.) I think this one stands out as one of the best examples of how movies, and audience expectations, have changed since the 60s and 70s. When this one first came out all the buzz was about the exciting action scenes on the track. By today's standards, the pacing is slow and the action looks staged, but this one still holds up for me. James Caan's performance as Jonathan E. is amazing. Jonathan is a man with only Two passions and both of them have become out of step with what the controllers of the society he lives in expect of him. During this last viewing, I found myself comparing his unemotional performance to that of Tom Hanks in Forrest Gump.

Rollerball was one of Two movies given to me this year in the giving of unusual DVDs as Christmas gifts between myself and the owner of the hobby shop where I work. (I've come to look forward to this as he's introduced me to some things I'd have not seen like The Fearless Vampire Killers [watch this one only if you like bad movies for being as bad as they are] and Hot Fuzz [the ads didn't appeal to me but now that I've seen it, I love it].) Anyway. The other movie this year was A Boy And His Dog. I've not re-watched that one yet. I'll have to get in the right frame of mind to watch it. I can see why some people love this movie, but my problem is that I read the Harlan Ellison story several times long before the movie was made. This story is like WSB's Naked Lunch (or any of his Wild Boys stories) in that you cannot make a faithful film version and expect to be able to openly show it - anywhere. On top of that, I expect that the film will not work because the sexual and moral attitudes will stand out like Dudley Moore's loveable drunk in Arthur when viewed against today's standards.

Kevin
Ensign
Posts: 21
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: June 20, 2013, 14:09
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I have to second Logan's Run and The Day the Earth Stood Still. I never made it to the Planet of the Apes sequels, either.

Torie
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Posts: 73
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: June 20, 2013, 14:24
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Man, Kevin is finding all these old posts. Okay I have to admit I've made basically no progress on the viewing list you guys gave me, EXCEPT that I went back last week and watched all of The Andromeda Strain (I had only seen the end before) and really enjoyed it.

bobsandieg-
o
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Posts: 58
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Post Re: 60s and 70s SF films
on: July 26, 2013, 12:16
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An update on my suggestion to watch <i> The Wicker Man</i>. If you grab a DVD today of the movie in all probability what you will see is called the Short Version. Then film's original cut ran just over 100 min long (103 or something like that.) The people who took over the studio during production hated the film and ordered the editor to cut it down to 88 minutes so it could play as the second feature on a drive-in bill. This is the version that was released to all theaters. The original negatives were lost/destoryed, perhaps tossed into a highway landfill, and as such the complete film has been lost for decades. There is a long version out there, but it's taken from 1" tape elements of a copy that had been sent for possible American distribution before the ordered cuts. That print was also lost. So the Long version has some really bad video and sound.
NOW just this week StudioCanal the people who now own the right have announced after a world wide search that American Long Print has been found! Harvard had it. This fall there will be a blu-ray release in the UK and USA of the original cut and in the UK a theatrical re-release. (I've got my fingers crossed for a US theatrical run as well.)
Torie -- see the long version.

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